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Marathwada Trail

by Bhairab Giri Goswami last modified 2009-09-10 10:31

Marathwada Trail is one of the three routes being explored by the Lok Awaas Yatra in the Central region. The Trail has a strong focus on people based processes for sustainable habitat development. Most of the projects proposed under this Trail also demonstrate the use of low carbon construction technologies. Latur suffered extensive damage in the Maharashtra earthquake in 1993.



Host: Sahyog Nirmitee, LaturMarathwada Map


Marathwada Trail is one of the three routes being explored by the Lok Awaas Yatra in the Central region. The Trail has a strong focus on people based processes for sustainable habitat development.  Most of the projects proposed under this Trail also demonstrate the use of low carbon construction technologies. Latur suffered extensive damage in the Maharashtra earthquake in 1993. The Trail also includes some post-earthquake rehabilitation projects that used alternate technologies for reconstruction. Covering 4 districts in South Maharashtra, the Trail provides an interesting opportunity to meet change makers from informal community groups, Gram Panchayts and the NGO sector.  A brief description of the projects proposed for visit is given below:


malumbra1.    Malumbra earthquake reconstruction

Malumbra is located in Ausa Taluka of Latur district of Maharashtra. It is a rehabilitated-relocated village constructed after the Latur earthquake which destroyed the original village completely. The reconstruction process in Malumbra village, through participatory methodology worked towards constructing safe houses, using locally available resources suitable to the needs of the residents. A village committee was formed and new land was purchased and plots allocated. Houses were constructed with a grant of 40,000 Rs. for 250 square feet by Plan International with additional contribution of about Rs 1200 - 10000 from the families. Using Laurie Baker techniques, a model house was set constructed for demonstration. The plan of each house was modified by the owner as per requirement and village planning was done by committee based on consensus in the village. The village committee purchased the building material required. They hired a labour contractor, and monitored his work which led to higher construction quality. Under the project, 80 houses were completed in 1 ½ years.


2.    Karaunji village Jal Swaraj project

Karaunji is located in Latur district. This too is a rehabilitated-relocated village of 232 houses constructed Karaunji village Jal Swaraj project after the earthquake. The villagers embarked on a piped water supply distribution programme facilitated by the jal Swaraj scheme of the state government under which the government provided 90% of the capital investment needed. The rest of the amount was contributed by the beneficiaries. The villagers set up a committee with 3 sub committees to look at different aspect of the programme. A piped water distribution system was then laid out complete with a overhead tank and underground water pump. The cost of the project was 26 lacs. 150 houses now have a regular water connection at their home, which is charged at Re1 / day.


3.    Bornadi wadi villageBahirgaon

Bornadiwadi is located in Osmanabad district of Maharashtra. This village has successfully undertaken integrated village development programmes.  NGO’s like Kranti Jyoti and Swayam Shikhsha Prayog created awareness among the villagers about different government schemes. The villagers then started a comprehensive village development programme which included water and sanitation programmes, water conservation and recharge, use of renewable energy, women empowerment and setting up SHG’s. All the programmes were supported only by the state and central government schemes. The village is now 100 % Open Defecation Free.


4.    Hivre Bazar

Hivre Bazar in Ahmednagar district has emerged as a model village. Hivre BazarThe village has successfully implemented water management measures and forest regeneration activities to create water surplus in a drought probe region. As against one unreliable crop in a year in the past, farmers now grow three, sometimes even four, crops. Hivre Bazar’s per capita income has increased from Rs 832 in 1991 to Rs 28,000 now. The villagers have planted 35 lakh trees and produce 5,000 liters of milk daily. In habitat terms, open defecation and urination have become history in Hivre Bazar, since every house has its own toilet, whose effluents, along with that of cattle sheds, support 112 biomass plants. These biomass plants, apart from providing basic electricity, also produce manure that is helping farmers to switch over to total organic farming. As many as 60 families, who had migrated in search of livelihood, have returned to their village. The village has a school, nursery, gymnasium, community centre, library, primary healthcare centre, veterinary clinic, open-air auditorium, solar-powered street-lighting and even an underground drainage network. Hivre Bazar, whose impressive panchayat building is called Gram Sansad (Village Parliament), has achieved all this with the villagers’ own collective, cooperative and participative efforts, with minimal dependence on government funds.


Bahirgaon5.    Bahirgaon

Located in Aurangabad district, Bahirgaon has made waves due to its integrated development model.  State Bank of India along with the village Panchayat has been the key force behind the development achievements in Bahirgaon. All the families have independent houses, though the size, type and quality vary built with people’s own savings and loans from SBI. The Panchayat has made available public land for BPL families to construct low cost houses.


The Panchayat has effectively utilized the funds allocated by the State Government to ensure clean roads, sanitation and water supply. All those who can afford, have constructed independent toilets. For the remaining population, community toilets have been constructed, separately for children, women and men.


Bahirgaon received a series of awards aggregating to Rs.25lakh for achieving total freedom from open defecation. There are other interesting local innovations too such as a common washing (laundry) ghat where the used water is again piped back into the fields. Another interesting innovation is the garbage management system based on organic treatment of the waste for conversion to compost. The Panchayat has also constructed a common Cattle Shed where the households not having own sheds can keep their animals free of cost.

     
 
 
 
     
 
 
basin South Asia 2009 Designed and supported by OneWorld South Asia