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Bundelkhand Trail

by bhairab last modified 2009-09-10 10:30

The Bundelkhand trail is one of the three routes being explored by the Lok Awaas Yatra in the Central region. The Trail has a strong focus on low carbon construction technologies with a climate change adaptation agenda. The range of experiences proposed under the trail demonstrates the application of alternate habitat technologies in residential, institutional and commercial context.


Host: Development Alternatives, OrchhaBundelkhand Map


The Bundelkhand trail is one of the three routes being explored by the Lok Awaas Yatra in the Central region. The Trail has a strong focus on low carbon construction technologies with a climate change adaptation agenda. The range of experiences proposed under the trail demonstrates the application of alternate habitat technologies in residential, institutional and commercial context. A variety of building materials ranging from compressed earth blocks to ferro-cement building elements are included in the trail. The Trail also has a strong focus on people based processes for sustainable habitat development.


The participants will also get to visit the historic city of Orchha in the trail. A brief description of the projects proposed for visit is given below:

1. TARAgram campus, Orchha

TARAgram was established in 1995 as a rural livelihoods and technology promotion centre by TARAgramDevelopment Alternatives. It displays the financial practicality of people and nature oriented production systems using innovative technologies.  Over the years, it has worked on innovative technologies on rural housing & sanitation, non conventional energy, ecology, environment and agriculture, rural industries, women technology, training & capacity building. The campus showcases these alternate technologies for application in rural, peri-urban and small town settings.  Demonstration is both, through models as well as practical use in their own facilities. The TARAgram initiative is a pioneering effort which is designed to maximise community benefits through an enterprise route. The challenge of TARAgram has been to recognise the community assets; resources, skill and aspirations. These assets have been converted to new economic opportunities through application of robust clean technologies for renewable energy generation, waste to wealth creation and recycling.


2. Solar energy in Rampura village

This project demonstrates a village habitat development model with emphasis on renewable Rampuraenergy promoted by SCATEC & DA. The Solar power plants (CSPPs)s of approximately 9 KW each, provide clean and reliable electricity to 150 households as well as to local micro-industry. In Rampura, the power is distributed through a local mini-grid; the power in the first stage was used for lighting, fans and entertainment/educational purposes (TV, radio). The plants are however sized so that the villagers may also utilize the electricity to improve existing, or establish new, income generating activities (flour mill, water pumping and distribution, sewing machines, cash crop drying etc). The villagers pay for the electricity. The revenues generated cover operations and maintenance costs, as well as the replacement of batteries and other components. The electricity tariffs are based on what villagers currently pay for different sources of energy, such as kerosene and diesel.


3. TARA Eco-Kiln Datia

The TARA Eco-Kiln is a Vertical Shaft Brick Kiln – an energy efficient, environment TARA eco kilnfrindly technology for firing clay bricks.  The technology is particularly suited for brick manufacture in developing countries for small scale and decentralized production units.  The VSBK technology was brought to Datia in 1996 from China and through intensive research indigenized to Indian conditions.  The TARAgram at Datia houses the first kiln which was then replicated to four different climatic zones of India and now has spread across the country with over 200 kilns in operation. Besides reducing energy costs, the VSBK offers a significant economic advantage to the entrepreneur – that of low business risk as gives results of each batch of firing within 24 hours and can be operated perennially as the kiln’s roof protects it from the vagaries of weather. With minimal land usage, the multiple-shaft production units enhance the ratio of land used to production output, and lead to a considerable improvement in the quality of bricks. The Data Center houses a centre for brick excellence which provides technical support services to brick manufacturers.


4. Water for all and always – village water security initiative

A collaborative effort by Development Alternatives and The Arghyam Foundation, the project is Watera significant step towards finding appropriate solutions in meeting the qualitative and quantitative requirements of basic services like water and sanitation in rural Bundelkhand. The trail will visit two of the villages each with 120 households. Piped water with stand posts, upgraded hand pumps, water troughs for animals, household latrines, village road with drainage, field bunding measures and plantation are taken up through people’s participation in decision making and management.  


Roof5. Flat roofs at Pahuj

The new DA-TARAgram campus at Pahuj, introduces alternatives for construction of flat roofs for Bundelkhand. These include pre-cast brick arch panels, RCC planks and joists, ferro-cement roofing channels and waste brick funicular shells along with the traditional practice of stone slabs. A team of 30 masons were trained at site during the construction of roofs in this campus. The systems are cost-effective, aesthetic and besides being more durable than the common practice of Reinforced Cement Concrete (RCC), also support skilled employment though manufacture of precast roofing elements. The Pahuj campus also demonstrates energy efficient and water saving farming practices along with solar pumping, drip irrigation, agro-forestry models etc. 


6. Integrated habitat development at Village Mador

Village Mador belongs to one of the poorest and most backward regions of India characterized by  Madordwindling natural recourses, few livelihood options and poor economic growth. Development Alternatives initiated the “sustainable habitat project in village Mador” with the objective of providing a pucca house with basic amenities and community facilities to 35 tribal families in the village in April 2005. The Mador project has proven to be innovative in several ways. It promoted the use of innovative design, materials and technologies in rural housing along with an innovative model of financing that was in the form of part grant and part loan. The village today has pucca houses, 2 community halls, 20 individual poultry sheds, 6 solar street light poles, a motor pump and a storage tank.

     
 
 
 
     
 
 
basin South Asia 2009 Designed and supported by OneWorld South Asia